Looking for a frienship and possibly more in shangdu

Duration: 9min 46sec Views: 405 Submitted: 23.06.2020
Category: Pissing
Marco Polo was a Venetian merchant believed to have journeyed across Asia at the height of the Mongol Empire. He first set out at age 17 with his father and uncle, traveling overland along what later became known as the Silk Road. Upon reaching China, Marco Polo entered the court of powerful Mongol ruler Kublai Khan, who dispatched him on trips to help administer the realm. Marco Polo remained abroad for 24 years.

Karakorum, the first capital of the Mongol world empire: an imperial city in a non-urban society

Kublai Khan - Wikipedia

Cities within a steppe environment and in societies based on pastoral nomadism are an often overlooked theme in the anthropological literature. Yet, with Karakorum, the first capital of the Mongol Empire AD — , we have a supreme example of such a city in the central landscape of the Orkhon valley in Mongolia. In this paper, we ask, what is the city in the steppes? Taking Karakorum as our starting point and case of reference and to attain a better comprehension of the characteristics of urbanism in the steppe, we apply a list of urban attributes compiled by Michael E.

Kublai Khan

According to Coleridge's preface to Kubla Khan , the poem was composed one night after he experienced an opium -influenced dream after reading a work describing Shangdu , the summer capital of the Yuan dynasty founded by the Mongol Emperor Kublai Khan. Upon waking, he set about writing lines of poetry that came to him from the dream until he was interrupted by " a person from Porlock ". The poem could not be completed according to its original — line plan as the interruption caused him to forget the lines. He left it unpublished and kept it for private readings for his friends until when, at the prompting of Lord Byron , it was published.
It is not the first to do so. However, unlike previous works, which treat Mongolian tenggeri as an abstract religious or political concept, this essay approaches the question from the empirical reality of heaven as given by the science of the day. The essay falls into two parts. The second part applies these principles to the case of the Mongols. The discussion describes the fundamental nature of heaven to the government of the Mongols and demonstrates this nature through a number of examples.