Latex gloved nurse

Duration: 13min 50sec Views: 554 Submitted: 12.02.2021
Category: Pissing
As Brazil reports a surge in the number of Covid cases as well as the death toll, the health system in the country is under pressure. As people around the world continues to bear the brunt of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic , the Latin American country has been badly impacted. The kind action of a nurse as she tried to simulate human touch by using disposable surgical gloves has won kudos. The image has been going viral across social media sites from Reddit to Instagram and people are saluting the nurse for her compassion and empathy. Two disposable gloves tied, full of hot water, simulating impossible human contact.

Nurse Gloves

Choosing the right glove for the right purpose | Nursing Times

But two nurses in the small city of Sao Carlos, in Sao Paulo state, have discovered a way to help with a millimeter of latex and some warm water that mimics a human touch. They fill latex medical gloves with warm water in a hospital shower, tying them off like water balloons. Cunha demonstrated how she puts the gloves on an unconscious man fighting for his life against COVID, placing one glove on each side of the hand. The man is one of several patients sharing a small hospital room, each person hooked to an array of machines tracking their vitals with a cacophony of beeps and alarms. The two nurses developed the method about a month ago, as the current brutal surge in COVID was gaining speed.

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The use of gloves is now a fundamental part of health care. Despite the problems associated with natural rubber latex NRL , it remains the preferred material for glove manufacture. Since the mids the use of gloves as an element of personal protective equipment has become an everyday part of clinical practice Pratt et al, The use of gloves plays a key role in reducing the transmission of micro-organisms between health-care workers and patients, and vice versa. Gloves also help prevent the exposure of skin to chemicals, hazardous drugs and various cleaning agents.
In the age of coronavirus personal protective equipment has become ubiquitous. We all look like surgeons in public now, donning masks and gloves even to go grocery shopping. Historically, even simple measures, such as doctors wearing gloves during surgery, were met with fierce resistance. Every time your doctor or nurse, or even a bus driver or grocery clerk, snaps on a pair of gloves, you can say a silent thank-you to Caroline Hampton and Joseph Bloodgood.